Juliet Daniel ’21 and Edie Fine ’21: Today’s Activists

Bronx Science students do not need to wait until graduation to change the world — they are already doing it.

Edie+Fine+21+takes+her+artivism+personally%2C+while+demonstrating+her+piece+for+the+art+rebellion.

Edie Fine

Edie Fine ’21 takes her ‘artivism’ personally, while demonstrating her piece for the ‘art rebellion’.

Oftentimes, we forget to remember that excellence goes beyond academics. Bronx Science is home to scientists, artists, writers, performers and politicians who also happen to be studious. They wish to create change through the stories they write, the miles they run, and the tournaments that they win. Here, students do not wait until after high school to create their futures — great accomplishments come now. 

One such student is Juliet Daniel ’21, who is a member of the Bronx Science Anti Racist Coalition (ARC), which works towards making school a welcoming environment for minority Black and Latinx student populations through several task forces. ARC has impacted hundreds of students at Bronx Science. 

Juliet Daniel ’21 credits her leadership style with being able to visualize the most effective ways to organize people and projects. (Juliet Daniel)

“ARC’s Racial Justice Committee helps the administration develop restorative justice protocols for racist offenses; on some occasions our members participate in restorative justice sessions,” said Daniel. Restorative justice means that racist behavior is handled through means of respect and reconciliation rather than punishment. She has developed and hosted anti-racist training sessions for leaders of the school’s Speech and Debate team, as well as drafted a code of conduct concerning the inappropriate usage of the N-Word. 

In June of 2020, ARC hosted a Black Lives Matter Town hall with over 300 attendees. Since then, Daniel has been helping with many more initiatives, and she is currently focused on easing the transition to Bronx Science: “Our mentorship program has helped over a dozen ninth graders adjust to the rigors of a specialized high school in an online environment and the challenges of being underrepresented in a large school,” said Daniel. 

Social media has allowed Daniel to further expand the reach of her activism. ARC’s Instagram account, @shadesofbxsci, has over a thousand followers. “Our Instagram page has been instrumental in our efforts to be transparent with the student body, especially during an online school year. We use our Instagram to promote events such as the colorism webinar that we hosted a few months ago, and to notify the student body regarding when our applications are open,” said Daniel. 

Daniel has been able to witness the effects of her work through others’ words of gratitude. “From the DMs that I get on both the ARC and my personal Instagram page, as well as my conversations with Black students who aren’t in ARC, it is my understanding that ARC has brought hope to students in our school,” said Daniel.

Daniel is not the only activist at Bronx Science. Just as racism is an issue that must be solved urgently, there are other social issues that have to be treated with the utmost importance. Another impressive student is Edie Fine ’21, who fights for climate justice.

Fine is a member of Extinction Rebellion Youth NYC (XRYNYC), a well-respected global network that focuses on climate justice, mutual aid, and non-violent direct action. “I have been the Arts Working Group coordinator since November of 2019, helping to facilitate the committee that works on our visual identity, our arts-centric projects, and infusing all of our demonstrations with a striking artistic edge,” said Fine. She focuses on “artivism,” which is the intersection of art and activism.

At the ARC meetings, Juliet Daniel ’21 joins forces with other impassioned students to start implementing broader, sweeping change at Bronx Science. (Juliet Daniel)
At the XRYNYC meetings, Edie Fine ’21 helps coordinate climate themed art show fundraisers. (Edie Fine)

 One of Fine’s first projects was a fundraiser in which they held a climate-themed art show. Their artivism included a gallery of visual art, a showing of short films and a live performance with spoken word, music and dance. It was a foundational moment in our group’s existence, as it cemented our advocacy work in art, community building, and regenerative culture,” said Fine. Her network has only grown since, and it now has over 300 members. 

“A few months after that, we threw together a demonstration to protest and call out the fashion industry, as they are known for unethical and unsustainable practices. We created garments out of trash and old clothing—“trashion”—and created our own fashion show,” said Fine. At XR, Fine has helped bring climate justice into the common psyche of New Yorkers in a very powerful and captivating manner.

As shown by Daniel and Fine’s commitments to social justice, it is apparent that no matter their age, all Bronx Science student are well-equipped to become active citizens. Not only do the deeds of Daniel and Fine directly affect the world, but they affect others. They spark a dialogue with the rest of Bronx Science students. It is the conversations in the hallways that inspire many new waves of activism to come.

Daniel has been able to witness the effects of her work through others’ words of gratitude. “From the DMs that I get on both the ARC and my personal Instagram page, as well as my conversations with Black students who aren’t in ARC, it is my understanding that ARC has brought hope to students in our school,” said Daniel.

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