AOC, Amazon, And My Final Words to the Bronx Science Community

Pietro Topa '19, Editorial columnists, presents his final Opinion piece of his high school career.

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Pietro Topa ’19, Editorial columnists, presents his final Opinion piece of his high school career.

On February 14th, 2019, Amazon announced that it would not be building its much hyped HQ 2 in New York City. This was after months of campaigning by prominent Democratic representatives aimed at getting Amazon to leave New York City in search of a new home. These campaigns’ argument as to why Amazon’s headquarters would not be have been a positive effect on the city were dubious at best and shows off the rampant populism that has arisen in the last five years. Instead of basing itself out of New York, Amazon has selected to move to Crystal City in Virginia.

Among the Amazon HQ 2 detractors was Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the freshman representative from the Bronx. Ocasio-Cortez is quoted as saying that, “Amazon is a billion-dollar company. The idea that it will receive hundreds of millions of dollars in tax breaks at a time when our subway is crumbling and our communities need MORE investment, not less, is extremely concerning.” This illustrates once again her complete lack of understanding of taxes and the deal that was proposed. The deal did indeed give Amazon a reported three billion dollars in incentives. However, over the next five years, Amazon would also give twenty-seven billion dollars in tax revenue to the city of New York and the state at large. AOC is correct in saying that our communities need more investment, but she clearly does not care about this, as she gave up the chance to have those funds available in order to seem tough on big business. It is pretty simple math, twenty-seven billion in tax revenue, minus three billion in incentives, leaves you with twenty-four billion dollars, money that you could use to solve the kinds of problems AOC loves to harp on about ad nauseam.

This is a problem that has arisen on both sides of the aisle and one that we should be very legitimately concerned with. Earlier in the year, I wrote an article entitled ‘An Empirical Affliction‘ which was all about Trump’s inability to comprehend numbers and to make rational decisions based on those numbers. It is clear to me that this problem stems from populism and one of the worst parts of our government system, reelection. Our politicians are less concerned nowadays about our well being and freedom than they are about achieving reelection and continuing to make money. T

he system has become corrupt and both sides of the political spectrum are completely blind to it. They only see the trouble when it is on the other side. People love to say that we need greater cooperation between the political parties but do not seem to understand what that means. How can you request greater cooperation between political ideologies and then shift your own ideology further to the extremes? Cooperation means finding a middle ground, and that requires coming closer to the center and not fighting for stasis.

We are all different in many ways, but the one difference in all of us that truly matters is our diversity of thought.

As I go off to college, I want my final remarks to my peers of Bronx Science to be one of compassion and love. I have loved this school, and I have loved my time here. That being said, the students at this school could learn to be more understanding. Don’t get me wrong, I am guilty of this, too. We need to learn to be better listeners, to learn to listen to the other side’s opinion, and to disagree respectfully. Do not dislike those of a different opinion; rather, allow them to think for themselves and do not require conformity. We are all different in many ways, but the one difference in all of us that truly matters is our diversity of thought. It is okay, and actually recommended, to think differently from those around you. 

With my love and affection, goodbye, Bronx Science.

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